According to the available data, running away accounts for most missing children reports in all categories: 72%.  Of the reported incidents of running away, 82% are repeat incidents[1].  In spite of that, we note that there is no databases documenting the evolution of the experiences of children who runaway, in Quebec.  In the course of our participatory action project, “Rejoindre les mineurs en fugue : une responsabilité commune en protection de l’enfance” (Inclure le lien menant à la section 5), the lack of information on the experiences of youth runaways has become an essential research question, in order to understand how  repeated incidents of running away impacts their transition from adolescence to adulthood.  This section of the website represents our small contribution to, and our first steps towards, an ongoing research project and / or database which would examine the lived experiences of Quebec runaways and consequences they experience while on the run, once they return and in their transition to adulthood.

 

Following this section, you will find a document entitled “Does repeated running away influence the transition from adolescence to adult life?”.  Written by participants in the project Rejoindre les mineurs en fugue : une responsabilité commune en protection de l’enfance, this document reinforces our belief that an ongoing research project and / or database dedicated to issues around running away should exist.

(Inclure le texte PDF : Les fugues répétitives à l’adolescence influencent-elles le passage à la vie adulte? (en anglais) Lien ici au document.


[1] Annual Report on Missing Children – 2003 to 2009

National Missing Children Services (NMCS)

Data collected by the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC)